Archive for October, 2014


Just like with us, in Veterinary medicine, early diagnosis and screening tests can save lives.

Often, when symptoms are already present a certain amount of damage has happened, and at times this damage is not reversible and lead to long term consequences.

In my practice I recommend every 6 months some basic and non invasive tests, such as: urine analysis, and complete blood work, that will help us detect signs of possible illness before they become clinically apparent. A urine analysis can detect signs of a urinary infection, renal disease, diabetes, among other serious diseases.

Complete blood work gives us an indication as to how the internal organs are functioning, and at time can help in detecting early signs of certain cancers.

I also often advise screening ultrasounds, as they do not involve radiation, and give us a non invasive visual on the structure of vital internal organs.

In conclusion: Early diagnosis and screening tests are an essential tool in the maintenance of our pets’ health. As, sadly, the life expectancy of our pets—dogs and cats—is much shorter than ours, our pets move quickly from infancy, to adulthood, to middle age, and before we know it they are senior-citizen-pets.

The more we know about their health, and the earlier we know it, can keep them with us alive and happy for as long as possible.

Dr. Ehud Sela

Gentle Vet Animal Hospital

Margate, Florida.

954-972-5900

Cryosurgery: Tumor freezing, is a valuable tool in treating skin tumors in many patients, and especially in older patients, or higher risk patients for general anesthesia.

Two dogs were treated as an outpatient for two large ulcerated skin tags. The procedure was done using a combination of Cryo-spray, and appropriately sized Cryo-chambers that fit the size of the tumor.

The procedure was done in the exam room, with the owner present–a thing that the dogs liked very much, and so did the owners. The procedure involved a few cycles of quick freeze and slow thaw, and involved no discomfort, or a very minimal discomfort for the patients.

Today, seven days post treatment, the tumors have shrunk significantly to the delight of the owners and the dogs.

I frequently use Cryosurgery for skin lesions for patients that general anesthesia is a higher risk, or patients that the tumors can be frozen, and thus avoid the general anesthesia. Of course, not all tumors, or lesion, are amenable to the procedure and an exam of the tumors/lesions is needed to establish if the patient is a candidate.

Dr. Ehud Sela

Gentle Vet Animal Hospital

Margate, Florida.

954-972-5900

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